Sunday, March 1, 2015

UNUSUAL WINTER BIRD SIGHTINGS



Pair of Surf Scoters
Male Harlequin Duck
At this time of the year, intrepid birders who are willing to brave the cold, snow and ice can be rewarded with views of unusual visitors to the bays of Sam Smith Park.  
Birds like the Harlequin Duck and the Surf Scoter need to rest up on their migration route from their winter grounds (marine coastal) to breeding grounds in the far north (boreal forest and tundra).  The Harlequin Duck is listed as “endangered” in Canada.

These birds were photographed by Brian Bailey yesterday close to the shore in the first and second bays (13th street entrance).

Friday, February 20, 2015

YES ..... MORE FANTASTIC COYOTE PICS! THANKS TO ZENY ATAS LLOYD






WEDNESDAY, FEB. 25TH - FIRST OPEN HOUSE - HUMBER COLLEGE'S WELCOME CENTRE INTERPRETIVE CENTRE

Humber’s College’s new Welcome Centre is set to open in 2016 at the corner of Kipling Ave and Lakeshore Blvd W.  The new Welcome Centre will host an Interpretive Centre that will feature artworks and heritage activities related to the site’s natural and built history, primarily, the former Lakeshore Psychiatric hospital and the surrounding ecology and waterfront. Friends of Sam Smith Park will sit on the Advisory Committee.


 
OPEN HOUSE

WHEN:
Wednesday February 25th 6:00pm to 8:00pm
& Sunday March 1st 1:00pm to 3:00pm


WHERE: 
Humber College, Lakeshore Campus
3199 Lake Shore Boulevard West
Toronto, ON M8V 1K8
Building A/B. Room A170 

 
Join Humber College staff for the first Open House about the Lakeshore Grounds Interpretive Centre. At this event, you will have the opportunity to: learn about the development of the Centre, contribute your feedback, and learn about community storytelling. 

These Open Houses are completely free to attend. For questions and directions, please contact Curator Tara Mazurk at  416-675-6622 x.79378 or by email.


The Interpretive Centre now has its own website.

As of now, the website offers basic information about the Lakeshore Grounds Interpretive Centre. Coming in March 2015, you will be able to use the website to contribute personal stories about your relationship to the grounds.  

Monday, February 9, 2015

NEW TORONTO ONE OF THE "LEAST TREED" AREAS IN THE CITY - IMPLICATIONS FOR SAM SMITH PARK



Aerial imagery for the City of Toronto in 2009 showed that forest cover represented at little more than one-quarter (26.6 per cent) of the city’s total land area, representing about 10.2 million trees. That’s up from 25.3 per cent a decade earlier. Toronto’s trees are mostly found on private property, accounting for 60 per cent of the city’s trees, with 34 per cent in the city’s parks and natural areas and six per cent lining our streets. 

Toronto’s most treed neighbourhoods are:
• Rosedale - Moore Park, 61.8 % • Bridle Path-Sunnybrook-York Mills, 55.6 %
• Mount Pleasant East, 54.8 per cent
• Morningside, 53.8 %
• Forest Hill South, 51.2 %

Toronto’s least treed neighbourhoods are: 
• Bay Street Corridor, 6.7 %
• Junction Area, 6.7 %
• Milliken, 8.1 %
• New Toronto, 8.7 %
• Humber Summit, 8.8 %

This information all comes from a comprehensive tree study released bythe City of Toronto in 2010 and updated in 2013 titled Every Tree Counts: A Portrait of Toronto’s Urban Forest